Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,108

    Clearances to electric meter

    Does anyone know the reference for clearances of air conditioning equipment to an outdoor electric meter? I cannot find it anywhere but I am told it is 4'? I am not sure if that is in front of or laterally?
    ...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,385
    Quote Originally Posted by kangaroogod View Post
    Does anyone know the reference for clearances of air conditioning equipment to an outdoor electric meter? I cannot find it anywhere but I am told it is 4'? I am not sure if that is in front of or laterally?
    I think that would fall under NEC 110.26 (Spaces About Electrical Equipment)

    Access and working area "free off obstructions" around the meter has to be a box that is :

    Depth - 3.0 - 4.0 feet (depending on voltage and conditions)

    Width - width of equipment or 30 inches (which ever is greater)

    Height - 6.5 feet


    Local codes might be more restrictive.
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,108
    Thanks,, appreciate it
    ...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,897
    Quote Originally Posted by rundawg View Post
    I think that would fall under NEC 110.26 (Spaces About Electrical Equipment)

    Access and working area "free off obstructions" around the meter has to be a box that is :

    Depth - 3.0 - 4.0 feet (depending on voltage and conditions)

    Width - width of equipment or 30 inches (which ever is greater)

    Height - 6.5 feet


    Local codes might be more restrictive.
    Using table 110.26 A 1, a condensing unit falls under "condition 2," with live parts on one side and the wall behind being grounded.

    So, believe it or not, a condensing unit that must be serviced using the control section facing the building, can be no closer to that building than 3' 6".

    I'm just sayin'.

    For the lateral distance from an electric meter, it is the width or the equipment or 30", whichever is greater.

    The meter must have the same clearance distance requirements as the condensing unit, but the meter faces open space, and so it falls under condition 1, and must have 3' of working space in front of the meter. Some rowhomes have a very narrow walkway between the homes to access the rear of the building, and it used to be accepted practice to put the meter sockets inside that space. Because it is a condition 3 situation when the meters face each other, that walkway would have to be a minimum of 4 feet wide today.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,385
    Thanks for the clarification.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,108
    I live for this stuff thanks
    ...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    14,196
    Quote Originally Posted by kangaroogod View Post
    Does anyone know the reference for clearances of air conditioning equipment to an outdoor electric meter? I cannot find it anywhere but I am told it is 4'? I am not sure if that is in front of or laterally?
    I asked an RG&E meter reader that very question last year. His basic un-official response was "as long as I can get to the meter without tripping your good-to-go"

    I put a condenser 3 to 4' from the meter, he didn't seem to care? just say'n
    BEING AN ADULT

    is the dumbest thing I have ever done

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,897
    Meter guys are not code officials, so their say-so means zip.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    14,196
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    Meter guys are not code officials, so their say-so means zip.
    read my response!!!!! I said "UN-OFFICIAL response was....."

    the best thing to do in these situations is to call BOTH the town Code Enforcement person AND the local power company. If you get approval from both of them you should be good-to-go.

    If they both defer to the other?....use your best judgment.

    The condenser I put in front of that meter was moved to install a addition, the code enforcement guy gave them a C of O, so it apparently was not an issue
    BEING AN ADULT

    is the dumbest thing I have ever done

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,897
    Quote Originally Posted by jmac00 View Post
    read my response!!!!! I said "UN-OFFICIAL response was....."

    the best thing to do in these situations is to call BOTH the town Code Enforcement person AND the local power company. If you get approval from both of them you should be good-to-go.

    If they both defer to the other?....use your best judgment.

    The condenser I put in front of that meter was moved to install a addition, the code enforcement guy gave them a C of O, so it apparently was not an issue

    What I said was that since he is not a code official, his opinion means zip, which means "even his UN-OFFICIAL opinion means nothing."

    The power Co is not an entity that can give a code opinion. Most power company equipment is specifically exempted from the code. The utility has ZERO interest in whether your meter meets code regarding it's placement to any other device. Their only care is that it is sealed and works reliably for the billing of power.

    The local enforcement person can only give a binding opinion if there is a permit issued and a written approval issued by his office. In a small town, they may be willing to issue an opinion without a permit, but the permits are how they cover their department costs.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    14,196
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    What I said was that since he is not a code official, his opinion means zip, which means "even his UN-OFFICIAL opinion means nothing."

    The power Co is not an entity that can give a code opinion. Most power company equipment is specifically exempted from the code. The utility has ZERO interest in whether your meter meets code regarding it's placement to any other device. Their only care is that it is sealed and works reliably for the billing of power.

    The local enforcement person can only give a binding opinion if there is a permit issued and a written approval issued by his office. In a small town, they may be willing to issue an opinion without a permit, but the permits are how they cover their department costs.
    I guess Im good-to-go then, the customer got a C of O. The condenser is about 18" from the addition and 3 to 4' from the meter?
    BEING AN ADULT

    is the dumbest thing I have ever done

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,897
    Quote Originally Posted by jmac00 View Post
    I guess Im good-to-go then, the customer got a C of O. The condenser is about 18" from the addition and 3 to 4' from the meter?
    That doc means the municipality is satisfied with the requirements that they choose to enforce, either via standards they have adopted, or more stringent standards that they have passed as local ordinances.

    Obviously, they are choosing to not require the nec standard for work area between the condenser and the building.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Rochester, NY, USA
    Posts
    14,196
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    That doc means the municipality is satisfied with the requirements that they choose to enforce, either via standards they have adopted, or more stringent standards that they have passed as local ordinances.

    Obviously, they are choosing to not require the nec standard for work area between the condenser and the building.
    it's quite possible that the building inspector doesn't have a clue about the NEC

    But no one has complained yet,
    BEING AN ADULT

    is the dumbest thing I have ever done

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event