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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,357
    They jumped around safeties. The maintenance staff was not trained for boiler maintenance.

    I have a report at home I will share.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,357
    Boiler Explosion, Paris Tennessee.pdf

    Here is the pdf of the report after the accident.


    Check out the pictures.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    The dark side of the moon.
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    Boiler Explosion, Paris Tennessee.pdf

    Here is the pdf of the report after the accident.


    Check out the pictures.
    Holy crap! there is some power in that.. wow

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    maple ridge, bc
    Posts
    107
    The potential you build up by simply walking on carpeting ranges from 12,000 to 20,000 volts. This is why your cat doesn't like you, touching his nose is only funny to one of you.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
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    18,357
    Quote Originally Posted by deerwhistle View Post
    The potential you build up by simply walking on carpeting ranges from 12,000 to 20,000 volts. This is why your cat doesn't like you, touching his nose is only funny to one of you.
    I think the point the OP was asking about was the difference between voltage and current in terms of lethality.

    I once worked on TV's at a service bench. I can tell you that a human can be exposed to the same voltage that is available on a typical utility feeder atop a tall pole: about 34 kv. The difference that allows me to be here typing this post today is the comparatively low current associated with that voltage exposure.

    Basically, current does three potentially deadly things, when there is sufficient amount of it, applied to the right place in the body:

    1) Burning. Just like those electric hod dog cookers that passed a current through the wiener to cook it. Yep. The myoglobin DOES look that that brown stuff!!!

    2) Cardiac signal problems. The heart has electrical signals that are easily overridden by currents. That's how those paddles work when they shout "CLEAR!"

    3) Muscular contraction. This is a step above #2 when it comes to the heart, as enough current through the heat muscle prevents any meaningful movement while the current is applied. This does not happen in most cases. It can also prevent breathing and the ability to "let go" of an energized conductor.

    These are current events. If the current cannot rise beyond a few milliamps (unless applied directly to the chest) you are usually not dead or dying.

    Does that help?
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  6. #19
    Do not play with either volts or amps , intending to find out .

    I have made some mistakes ( usually stupid mistakes ) , that only by the Grace of God am I here to admit to .

    God bless
    Wyr

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,057
    And do not forget: When working with anything electrical--even a 24V control circuit of a residential system--One's feet must be dry.

    Standing in water is a guaranteed way to multiply the effects of electricity.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    STP, MN
    Posts
    143
    Arc flash anyone?

  9. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny651 View Post
    Arc flash anyone?
    Yep . Been there , done that . Did not get a TT-Shirt . :-(

    God bless
    Wyr

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,073
    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    There is a lot more to electrocution but this is a start. For one, different forms of electricity may or may not induce ventricular fibrillation in the heart, which is where you drop and hope someone starts CPR as another runs for an Automatic External Defibrillator or AED. BTW, defibrillation is usually 200-360 joules or watt seconds of dc countershock.

    If you survive, you may still go into renal failure 3-5 days later as the myoglobin in your blood clogs your kidneys. Ever noticed that brown jelly-like stuff when you fry a bloody steak? That's what your myoglobin looks like in your bloodstream after an electrical shock.
    Thanks for the reminder Bob!

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    923
    I got stuck once, went in left hand and out right hand and arm, ended up with an exit wound on right hand and mild burns on right arm. The scariest and most painful thing I have ever experienced. Not being able to scream or move, the only thing I think that saved me was the fact I was crouched in an awkward position and eventually fell backwards. No idea of how long I was stuck but it felt like forever. Many blood tests over a few days and heart monitoring I was lucky. Electricity scares me even years later, not sure if that is good or bad, but I am sure careful around it. There was a nosy store manager that came on the roof just before that had no idea of what was happening or what to do, even after I laid on the roof in the fetal position.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    lake of the ozarks,MO
    Posts
    310
    I was told in school it take less that 1/10 of an amp to stop your heart.

  13. #26
    this why most people should defiantly consult an electrician if they don't know what they are doing. defiantly a scary thought!!

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