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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Overland Park, KS
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    Looking for Some Good Resources on Bonding & Grounding

    Although bonding and grounding is a fundamental topic in electrical theory, it amazes me how much confusion it can cause. Does anyone have any good resources to share, which would help others better understand how to design and install Code-compliant installations? I'm interested in any books, articles, research documents or misc. reference materials that I could pass along to my readers.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Southeastern Pa
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    Quote Originally Posted by meby View Post
    Although bonding and grounding is a fundamental topic in electrical theory, it amazes me how much confusion it can cause. Does anyone have any good resources to share, which would help others better understand how to design and install Code-compliant installations? I'm interested in any books, articles, research documents or misc. reference materials that I could pass along to my readers.
    Only this one...

    http://www.mikeholt.com/productitem....=All&type=Book
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    East of Lyndon's
    Posts
    525
    Soares Book on Grounding and Bonding, 2011-NEC
    If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2004
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    S.E. Pa
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    6,058

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    2,557
    We use a big hammer drill to put our grounding rods in. We turn the switch to hammer only and lock it so it can't be turned to spin. A safety person is ready to pull the plug. All of our outdoor permanent equipment that's on the ground has its own grounding rod. Rooftop equipment is grounded via the lightening grounds, our older buildings lack this system.

  6. #6
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    Nov 2006
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    Southeastern Pa
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    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    We use a big hammer drill to put our grounding rods in. We turn the switch to hammer only and lock it so it can't be turned to spin. A safety person is ready to pull the plug. All of our outdoor permanent equipment that's on the ground has its own grounding rod. Rooftop equipment is grounded via the lightening grounds, our older buildings lack this system.
    That raises a couple of points.

    Grounding electrodes (in this case, rods)

    1) are not required at each piece of equipment, and the equipment MUST have a equipment grounding conductor other than the electrodes, if installed, in order to provide a low impedance path to assist in opening the overcurrent device(s) that feed a given piece of equipment

    2) cannot be used with lighting protection equipment, which must have its OWN electrodes

    Buildings from a time when grounding conductors were not being installed are not protected for ground fault or overcurrent protection, as the additional grounding conductor and electrode are not connected at the panel. The earth resistance is too great to open the overcurrent device(s) should a fault occur. Supplementary grounding electrodes and their grounding conductors can be connected together so that all are electrically connected to the panel entrance neutral, and then protection for ground fault and short circuit events will be in place.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Dry as a bone Tucson
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    4,055
    Grounding to the "EXTREME"
    I've worked on buildings that were grounded to a "star" ground. It had "many" rods pounded into the ground and then criss crossed with wire. These buildings were comp labs. They also had lightning rods on top with #6 wire run across the perimeter and on my package units. Inside the building above the grid ceiling there was another large bare (#6?)ground wire where individual pieces of equipment were grounded again. Someone told me that the equipment and the info on it was "priceless" and the grounding system was an insurance policy.
    Some Talk, Some Do
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Overland Park, KS
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    45
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    Thanks Timebuilder!

    We're well aware of Mike Holt and his products. Mike serves as our main NEC Consultant for the magazine. We also sell many of his training products through EC&M Books. He does a wonderful job of explaining the NEC rules and requirements is a clear and concise manner.
    Mike Eby
    Editor-in-Chief, EC&M Magazine
    http://www.ecmweb.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Overland Park, KS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wendo View Post
    Soares Book on Grounding and Bonding, 2011-NEC
    Wendo,

    Soares is another great reference that's been around for many years. Thanks!
    Mike Eby
    Editor-in-Chief, EC&M Magazine
    http://www.ecmweb.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Overland Park, KS
    Posts
    45
    Hearthman,

    Those UL references are valuable and not mentioned enough when we discuss the topic of bonding and grounding. Thanks for reminding me we need to talk about these more frequently.
    Mike Eby
    Editor-in-Chief, EC&M Magazine
    http://www.ecmweb.com

  11. #11
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    May 2009
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    In the Hudson Valley of New York
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    Article 250 of the NEC has every thing you need to know about grounding and bonding.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
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    6,058
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ufer_ground

    Depending upon your soil conditions, an EGC rod driven may not suffice.

    Also, many bonding jumpers at meters I find either disconnected or inadequate. There was a local plumber electrocuted about 15yrs ago when he went to disconnect a jumper at the meter without first installing an automotive jumper cable across the meter.

    Also look into bonding requirements for metal frame construction. A technician was killed in Fla. a few years back when he went to install a dryer vent and contacted an energized metal stud wall.

    As for CSST, note the new lightning strike resistant technologies by mfr. and the rules for applications with the new vs. old. For instance, you cannot route old style CSST through a chase that contains a metallic vent or chimney. Typically you are allowed to use the new technology in such applications.

    Another common no-no is attaching CSST directly to the cabinet of an appliance such as with conduit clips--no longer allowed unless new technology. Otherwise, needs to be electrically isolated from the appliance except for gas connection to valve.

    A lot of guys will bond CSST to a water line and think they're ok. If the street service is plastic, this is useless.

    Gas piping can NOT be used to conduct electricity. It may have to be bonded but never used as a neutral.

    There is no prescription for bonding fireplaces and metal chimneys or liners at this time. Nobody has figured out the bonding clamp. I have in the past used aluminum bonding adapters that allowed me to bond a #6 solid copper wire to a steel 'I' beam but think about it--it that bond takes a high amperage hit from lightning, that aluminum clamp will be a puddle of molten aluminum in a fraction of a second much like a fuse.

    Before you drive EGC rods, call your local Dig Safe authority and have the underground lines marked. The liability is huge and your insurance may not cover it if you screw up.

    HTH

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tidewater Virginia
    Posts
    64
    Question for you about the CSST Heartman...
    Are you refering to not electrically bonding the CSST to the appliance cabnet? I would have thought the CSST would be electrically bonded to the appliance when the metalic gas connection fittings are attached between the CSST and the gas inlet (to my knowledge, the gaskets in the fittings don't act as dielectrics).

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